Marketing

Anything Is Possible

Posted by on May 13, 2016 | 0 comments

W1936380_10209068165529186_1203501228310202190_nho knew that I would transition from nonprofit consultant to nonprofit founder?

Who knew that I would enter the addiction recovery industry, wide-eyed and naive, and that it would become my passion?

Who knew that in my late-50s I would take an unexpected very sharp turn to the left and change my career path completely?

Not me. Not me. Not me.

And yet, here I am, surrounded by real life heroes every single day – addicts in recovery – some of the most resilient, kind, courageous and sincere people I’ve ever known. And together we are changing lives and saving lives.

Visit our website at 10000beds.org to learn more about our addiction scholarships and the amazing treatment professionals and facilities we work with!

If you are interested in booking me as a speaker, please contact me directly at jean@10000beds.org and let’s talk! My presentations remain based in motivational topics, but expand with new life experiences every year! How exciting is that?!

My new favorite presentation is based on my soon-to-be-published book: In The Shower. Watch for it! I talk about the crazy places we can experience inspiration or AH HA moments, the importance of self-care, the real definition of success, the power of one, the leadership gene in all of us, and the reality that anything is possible.

See you soon!12923323_10209423046280983_4557455249999223668_n

 

Jean

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There Comes A Time

Posted by on Aug 21, 2015 | 0 comments

adieuThere comes a time when we all need to look at our lives and simplify. For me, that time is now.

The Resource Tank has been my bread and butter for many years. It launched my speaking career, connected me with clients, and provided me a respected base to call my “business home”. I will forever be grateful.

Yes, that means what you think it might. The Resource Tank is quietly fading into the sunset, but this redhead is enthusiastically bursting into the limelight. In my world simplifying seems to always morph into new chaos.

My goal is to continue speaking, but my focus has evolved beyond leadership to include the reality of career ups and downs, and how every single thing that happens in your career matters. Everything Matters. In life, in business, in family. The little things, the big things, the things no one knows about but you. Everything. And this matters, it’s the end of an era for me in many ways.

And so, it’s with love, respect, and gratitude that I close one chapter in my life to open another. My newest venture 10,000 Beds, Inc. will launch on September 1st, 2015. If you’re reading this, you are one of the few in the know. (Lucky you!)

10,000 Beds is a registered 501c3 nonprofit organization working with partner treatment facilities across the United States to identify and award 10,000 scholarship treatment beds by 2020.

Our goal is to provide help through these donated scholarship beds to addicts who need help and want help, but can’t afford the cost of residential treatment. We have received overwhelming support and positive responses from everyone we’ve talked to about this effort…and we haven’t even launched!

10,000 Beds is a sister company to Helping Recovery, my primary marketing business. We work with clients who need treatment and facilities who can provide treatment and we put the two together. It’s an emotional, rewarding, all-encompassing work. And we are passionate about it.

Addiction has touched our family and I am certain it’s touched yours, or someone you know. If you ever need help finding the best treatment center for someone, we are the people to call. We are experts. We do this every day, all day. We care and we will do whatever we can to help. You can reach us at 801-875-2821 or jean@helpingrecovery.org.

Am I still available to speak? You bet! And I’ll still be crazy busy. I just won’t be working under the moniker of The Resource Tank. My office won’t change, my java mug won’t change, my desk won’t change, but my business name has changed.

So, I will bid TRT a fond farewell, and carefully tuck this blog in the cloud for safekeeping. Because as we all know, nothing ever really goes away anymore, it simply goes dormant and becomes an out of sight piece of our past.

Thank you for supporting me all these years…now come find me at 10000Beds.org or HelpingRecovery.org! There’s a lot going on in the world of recovery and we are honored to be part of it.

Speaking to audiences about the power of change, the reality that everything matters, the experiences of life that mold great leaders, and working with people to help them rediscover a clean and sober life keeps me on a personal “high” every single day. I’m blessed, grateful and more excited than ever.

My career has been a roller coaster of awesome experiences. I wouldn’t change a thing. And that’s the message I need to deliver, I want to deliver, and that audiences love to hear. It’s all good, it all matters, and it all leads us to our ultimate calling and destiny.

So off I go…thanks again!

(Oh, and that whole “simplify” idea…it will never happen in my lifetime, but it IS my reoccurring daydream.)

And now. Adieu.

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The Attitude of Gratitude

Posted by on Nov 25, 2014 | 0 comments

Attitude-of-Gratitude_1024x1024Life doesn’t always make us want to say “thank you.” We have ups and downs, successes and failures. And sometimes things happen that simply don’t make any sense at all. I’ve just experienced something like this. And after a week or so of shaking my head and wondering, as the transition plan from one assignment to another is in the works, as I’ve spent way too many hours contemplating how this change will effect me and others, I’ve finally taken a deep breath, regrouped, asked myself some serious questions, and now I have only one main thought:

THANK YOU!

  • Thank you for forcing me to shift gears.
  • Thank you for being the catalyst that made me reevaluate my priorities.
  • Thank you for returning me to my family.
  • Thank you for reminding me that every ending is a new beginning.
  • Thank you for giving me the opportunity to work with amazing people on amazing programs.
  • Thank you for widening my eyes while broadening my experience.
  • Thank you for sharing your passion with me.
  • Thank you for all I’ve learned.
  • Thank you for this new start.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

Sometimes our initial reaction to change is knee-jerk, simply because it’s new, it’s foreign, it’s life-changing. Or sometimes, our initial reaction is because we aren’t prepared, we haven’t been paying attention.

Ask yourself, am I paying attention? If your career seems to be sliding into autopilot, if you’ve become satisfied with the status quo, I would suggest an attitude of gratitude is needed. Sit up straighter, write bolder, think broader, and be more grateful!

The right attitude can change your life in ways you never could have expected.

Ask yourself, what is my attitude saying to others and doing to me?

Today, my attitude is one of gratitude. I hope yours is too.

Now, ask yourself, what am I grateful for today?

Start writing!

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7 Lessons Learned (Because I Failed)

Posted by on Jun 8, 2014 | 0 comments

Recently I’ve been on a speaking binge. I’m not sure why the flurry of activity, but within the past few months I’ve received invitations to speak at several national, state and local conferences and to a variety of nonprofit organizations.  I’ve enjoyed each opportunity to share my thoughts and meet new friends. I’ve been especially grateful for the excellent references and reviews I’ve consistently received from the groups I’ve been speaking to. It’s been a confidence-inspiring whirlwind of activity.

Until yesterday.

Yesterday I failed.  It was a comedy of errors from beginning to end, but it wasn’t really funny.

My presentation fell flat. It was disjointed and probably confusing to the audience. It’s a wonder they didn’t ask me what I was talking about.  Following the presentation, I couldn’t remember anything I said.

This experience has taught me seven important lessons to remember if you find yourself speaking to a group:

  1. Arrive 30 minutes early.
  2. Preparation cannot be underestimated.
  3. Know your venue.
  4. Never assume.
  5. Anticipate what might go wrong.
  6. Punting is OK.
  7. Say “No” When Your Gut Tells You To
  8. Sleep the night before, no matter what.
I learned these seven important lessons the hard way. I failed on every one of them. Considering my speaking experience, there was and is no excuse for the comedy of errors, and more importantly, that I didn’t rebound well once they happened.
I learned these seven important lessons because I made these seven critical mistakes (and I knew better!):
  1. I arrived early, but not as early as I should have. A few extra minutes would have given me time to gather my thoughts, reorganize my notes and give a logical presentation.
  2. My preparation time was cut short. I managed a lot of non-essential tasks during the week prior to yesterday’s event: I should have spent that “free time” fine tuning my presentation and visiting the venue.
  3. I had not visited the venue prior to speaking: knowing the room set up helps prepare you to stand in front of your audience.
  4. I assumed there would be a podium – there was not. This was a first, but it’s now a question I will always ask: “Is there a podium?”
  5. And although I had asked for a projector and screen, I had not anticipated a lack of connection chords, the inability to connect to my MacBookPro, and I most certainly did not anticipate the sudden SNAP of the screen as it tore from the frame and flopped to the floor just before my presentation. I mean, who would EVER anticipate that? (The organizers actually tried to flop the screen over the top of the screen’s frame and for a few minutes my PowerPoint was beamed onto the flopping, buckled screen until my OCD took over and I asked them to turn it off).
  6. My presentation was tightly linked to the PowerPoint slides, and I attempted to give the same presentation without the slides…not smart. What I should have done was reorganized in my mind and hit the high points unscripted and without the crutch of slides. I probably could have done that if I had been better prepared.
  7. This was a very short notice request by someone I know and respect. I said “yes” when my gut was telling me to say “no”. I knew my time was tight and preparation would be tough.
  8. I only had 3 hours sleep the night before the presentation. I was exhausted, which undoubtedly added to my inability to rebound as I normally can.
Failure isn’t fun under any circumstances, but if we can learn from our mistakes, failure can become a springboard to greater success in the future. Remember the saying: When you fail to plan, you plan to fail. I resembled that remark yesterday.
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Who Cares?

Posted by on May 10, 2012 | 0 comments

It’s amazing how few people seem to really care any more.

Is it because we’re all to busy to notice, or have we lost our sensitivity to anything outside of our own life, or maybe it’s a result  of too much technology- we love our flat screens more than people? Who knows?

What I do know is that caring about others is as important as breathing. When our lives reach beyond our own personal concerns, we can reach our potential; without that outreach we become stagnant.

And how can we expect people to listen if they don’t even know us, or more importantly, if we don’t know them; if we don’t care, or it appears we don’t care?

This “care factor” is critical to organizations as well, it doesn’t just apply to individuals. It’s easy to go through the basic motions of “maintaining relationships” with very little emotion or energy involved. But is it the right thing to do? I would suggest that it is not.

If we are “reaching out” through a series of calculated development efforts without any personal concern for who’s on the other end of our message, we are missing what might be an amazing opportunity for growth, for friendship, for support.

You might be wondering why it really matters, after all how anyone would know that you didn’t really care.  How could, for instance, a donor tell the difference?

We’ve all been trained (or use someone who has) to write compelling direct mail pieces that are created to touch a heart or prick the mind. Just the presence of emotion is enough to show we care, isn’t it?

The answer, again, is no, it is not enough.

We (hopefully) remember to send our thank you notes in a timely fashion after we receive a donor gift. And we try to make them personal, don’t we? This shows we care, doesn’t it? No.

No, no, no.

The only way to really CARE about your donors is by knowing them, or at the very least, understanding their reason for giving to your organization.

To know a donor, you have to listen, not just talk. When we email, we are talking, but not listening. When we send direct mail, we are talking, but not listening.

It takes personal effort, personal communication, personal interaction to gain an opportunity to listen, to discover the reasons you should care. I’m talking about phone calls, lunches, events, any chance you can create to meet with your donor one-on-one, to have a conversation, to offer a smile, to say a personal face-to-face thank you, to ask for their input, to hear about their life.

The more we listen, the more we will care, and the more we care, the more our ideas will be heard and responded to.

As Fred Smith of the Competitive Enterprise Institute recently reminded me, “People don’t care what we know until they know that we care.”

I think we all need this reminder.

Who cares? We all should. Especially if we want to make a difference; if we want our ideas to be heard. If we want to make a friend, if we want to gain a partner, if we want to build an effective team.

Who cares? I do. And I hope you do too.

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